1

Kwong Von Glinow Design Office is an award-winning architecture practice founded on the belief that architecture is meant to be enjoyed.

2

Recently, “Give me a minute, please!” was selected as the inaugural Designing a Better Chicago Riverwalk pavilion, coming June 2021.

more...
3

Ardmore House was recently completed and written up in Crain's Chicago as a “house unlike any other.”

more...
4

Kwong Von Glinow starts new contemporary renovation project of a historic Howard Van Doren Shaw home for an art collector.

5

The Swiss Consulate Chicago - a collaborative design project with Swiss Architecture office HHF for the new offices at the Hancock Tower - was recently completed. Stay tuned for more soon!

more...
6

Architect Magazine names Kwong Von Glinow a “Next Progressive”!

more...
1
Future Housing

“In every city in the world, housing is the first question architecture deals with.”

Ardmore House

House that flips the programmatic status-quo of the typical domestic section.

Towers within a Tower

An alternate tower typology that uses verticality to the benefit of community.

Storage T

Smuggling storage into a small apartment dwelling.

House, Some of This, Some of That

A house that reinvents borrowed architectural tropes.

House XYZ

The house erases constraints of walls and floors, and is governed by coordinates X, Y, Z.

The 3-Families House

Housing with a form that responses to Shaoxing's historic neighborhood.

The Table Top Apartments

Apartments that use a system of modules based on the form of stacking table tops.

2
Public/Cultural

“The best designed public spaces never dictate or manipulate the visitor to use a space in a certain way.”

Give me a minute, please!

A place of respite and relaxation along the Chicago Riverwalk.

Block Sauna 143

A neighborhood sauna that is at once extremely public and extremely private.

MoMA PS1 Beach Party

A reinterpretation of the MoMA PS1 courtyard as a beach

Chinatown Gateway

A gateway greets visitors with a unique circular form - the universal symbol of inclusion and harmony.

The Primitive Pavilion

A free-flowing space in West Kowloon’s Cultural District.

In the Loop

An accessible ramp that also serves as a gathering space for San Antonio’s City Hall.

Grand Lattice

An award-winning design for pedestrians to access viewing decks along Chicago’s waterfront.

3
Commercial

“New experiences for workplace and culinary environments energize new ways of being in commercial spaces.”

Swiss Consulate Chicago

The new Swiss Consulate Chicago brings a domestic language to the office interior at the Hancock Tower.

Dizzy’s SoHo

Dizzy's curates an interior vertical sensory experience.

4
Exhibition

“By borrowing the familiar and smuggling architecture we seek to relate our projects to a wide audience.”

Architectural League Prize: Objective Installation

An installation that builds on borrowing the familiar.

Crowns

Reimagining crown molding as an element for spatial sculpture.

Smuggling Architecture

Reclaiming the suburban home as a site for architecture.

1
Office

“Our ultimate ambition is to create beautiful architecture that all people can relate to and enjoy.”

Kwong Von Glinow Design Office is an award-winning architecture practice based in Chicago founded on the belief that architecture is meant to be enjoyed. The practice builds the thoroughly enjoyable from the slightly familiar. Their work translates forward-looking architectural concepts into playful designs with broad appeal. Taking an optimistic and explorative approach, KVG focuses on creating innovative living environments, places for cultural engagement, urban public space, and contemporary workspaces. The office was founded in 2017 by Lap Chi Kwong and Alison Von Glinow and has delivered projects ranging from single-family homes to multi-family residential buildings, public and cultural spaces, exhibitions, and designed objects.

The firm’s current projects include the renovation of a 12,000-square-foot Howard Van Doren Shaw home in Highland Park, IL for an art collector family; the inaugural Designing a Better Chicago Riverwalk pavilion to be built in summer 2021; and a community center and housing project in New York. They recently completed both Ardmore House—a single family home in Chicago—and the new Swiss Consulate Chicago at the Hancock Tower.

Select Awards
2019 Inaugural winner Designing a Better Chicago
2019 Graham Foundation Grantee
2018 Architectural League Prize of NY
2017 Wallpaper* Magazine’s list of top Emerging Practices

2
Team
Lap Chi Kwong

Lap Chi earned his Masters of Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and his undergraduate degree from the University of Washington. Before co-founding Kwong Von Glinow, Lap Chi worked with the Pritzker Prize-winning offices of Herzog & de Meuron and Amateur Architecture Studio on cultural projects, single-family houses, and multi-family residential buildings, including the M+ Museum in Hong Kong, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Kramlich Residence & Gallery in California. Lap Chi spent his early life in Hong Kong before moving to Seattle for his undergraduate education. He is an adjunct professor of Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.

Alison Von Glinow

Alison earned her Masters of Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and her undergraduate degree from Barnard College. Before co-founding Kwong Von Glinow, Alison worked with internationally acclaimed practices around the world including Herzog & de Meuron in Basel, Switzerland; SOM in both Chicago and New York; Toshiko Mori Architect in New York; and Svendborg Architects in Copenhagen, Denmark. A Chicago native, Alison is a Board Member of the Chicago Architectural Club and Chair of the Burnham Prize. She is a licensed architect in the states of Illinois and New York and a member of New York’s Urban Design Forum.

Present
Lap Chi Kwong
Principal
Alison Von Glinow, AIA
Principal
Eric Shichen Li
Junior Designer
Yue Liang
Architectural Assistant
Jean-Francois Goyette
Marketing Director
Past
Chieh Chih Chiang
Junior Designer
Amanda Darmasoputro
Junior Designer
Jimmy Carter
Junior Designer
Junfu Cui
Architectural Assistant
Winee Lau
Architectural Assistant
Tammy Phan
Architectural Assistant
Tanil Raif
Architectural Assistant
Prim Rattanathumawat
Architectural Assistant
Adam Botao Sun
Architectural Assistant
Ziqi Wang
Architectural Assistant
Raven Nan Xu
Architectural Assistant
3
Clients
The Architectural League of New York
Canadian Center for Architecture
Chicago Architectural Club
The City of Chicago
Design Museum of Chicago
The Gonkas
Hong Kong Biennial
India Home
The MART
Next Home Seoul
PS1 MoMA
Storefront for Art and Architecture
Swiss Architecture Museum
The Swiss Federation of Buildings
4
Bulletin

Tune in for our upcoming lectures listed below. Check out our past events, awards, and publications.

10.2020
Lecture

KVG will share the development of Ardmore House with LIGA as part of their series La Casa Del Vecino / Our Neighbor’s House.

more...
10.2010
Award

KVG is named “Next Progressive” by Architect Magazine.

more...
10.2020
Teaching

KVG coordinated 6 2020 graduates who presented manifesto “Defiant Optimism” for the Architectural League of New York’s Reimagine dialogue.

more...
10.2020
Lecture

KVG with chat with John McMorrough about Ardmore House for the series Practice.Architecture.Talks.

more...
8.2020
Award

KVG is selected as one of 32 Pre-Qualified Design Services Firms for Chicago’s Invest South/West Initiative.

more...
8.2020
Press

KVG is interviewed by Dennis Rodkin of Crain’s in his article on Ardmore House titled “In Edgewater, a house unlike any other.”

more...
8.2020
Press

Dennis Rodkin of Crain’s discusses Ardmore House on Crain’s Daily Gist and deems Kwong Von Glinow “a firm to watch.”

more...
more bulletin posts...
5.2020
Writing

KVG write a piece titled “Sharing Architecture Perseveres” for A+U’s Architecture, Hope & COVID-19 series.

more...
3.2020
Lecture

Alison is a panelist for Alternative Modes of Practice moderated by Reed Kroloff at IIT.

11.2019
Award

KVG’s design is selected for the inaugural Designing a Better Chicago Pavilion.

more...
11.2019
Exhibition Opening

KVG’s Smuggling Architecture installation opens at the Swiss Architecture Museum (SAM) in Basel, Switzerland.

more...
11.2019
Award

KVG’s Towers within a Tower receives 2019 HK DRIVEN X DESIGN Award.

more...
9.2019
Event

KVG host Chicago’s first Dinner with Designers - hot pot style - and give a tour of Ardmore House under construction.

more...
8.2019
Jury

Alison serves on the AIA Arizona jury for 2019 Design Awards.

7.2019
Award

KVG is named as IIT College of Architecture’s summer Artists in-Residence for 2019.

more...
5.2019
Jury

Alison serves on the Jury of the Art Institute of Chicago’s 2019 Schiff Foundation Fellowship.

5.2019
Press

KVG is interviewed by South China Morning Post: “High-rise housing designed to battle urban loneliness” featuring Towers within a Tower.

more...
4.2019
Award

KVG are selected as Graham Foundation Grantees for their project Smuggling Architecture.

more...
12.2018
Press

DEZEEN X MINI LIVING feature Towers within a Tower and Table Top Apartments.

more...
6.2018
Award

KVG are awarded the 2018 League Prize for Young Architects by the Architectural League of New York.

more...
4.2018
Press

KVG is featured in FRAME Magazine in their issue on High Density Housing titled How We Will Live Tomorrow.

2020
Last Updated
October 2020
Website Design
Studio Lin
Programming
Yeon Ryoo
1
Visit

Kwong Von Glinow
1326 W. Ardmore Ave.
Chicago, IL 60660

3
Subscribe
Stay up to date with KVG news and announcements.
4
Apply
We currently have open office positions. Write to hello@kwongvonglinow.com and include your CV and Portfolio (as attachment or google link). Please state your position of interest at our Chicago Office.
1/17

Ardmore is a single-family house located on a typical Chicago block, sitting at the intersection of the street front and an alleyway.

3/17

While the alleyway is often overlooked due to concerns of privacy and noise levels, these constraints were designed around to take advantage the amount light that could be brought into the home off of its longest facade.

4/17

To fit in with the neighborhood, the facade is broken up into two colors - black and grey - to scale the volume.

5/17

The longest facade of the home sits across from a balcony lined apartment building.

6/17

To maximize the amount of light where time is most spent, we flipped the traditional domestic section and placed the living areas on the second level, and the bedrooms on the first floor.

7/17

With living spaces rather than bedrooms on the upper floor, the private spaces of the lower level are tucked away behind an interior courtyard.

8/17

The west side of the house facing the alleyway is supported by traditional balloon frame construction, which sits upon concrete foundation walls enclosing the basement, and supports four major roof trusses.

9/17

The kitchen, living, and dining spaces are located on the upper level, with a curved interior courtyard on level 1.

10/17

The interior courtyard is formed by a swelling of the hallway connecting the bedrooms on the lower level.

11/17

The second level is reached from a concealed staircase behind the courtyard’s curved wall.

12/17

Conceived of as more than a hallway, the interior courtyard offers a space of its own, overlooking the active alleyway and serving as a space for a cup of coffee or a play area for children.

13/17

The stair is tucked behind the curved wall of the interior courtyard.

14/17

All of the second level living spaces are connected together under one large roof and defined by their location underneath structural trusses.

15/17

The upstairs is defined by 4 trusses with skylights between them, distinguishing 5 unique spaces.

16/17

The four structural trusses define five spaces: the living room, the powder room, the dining room, the island, and the kitchen.

17/17

The kitchen lines the northern facade.

×
1/29

Ardmore is a single-family house located on a typical Chicago block, sitting at the intersection of the street front and an alleyway.

3/29

While the alleyway is often overlooked due to concerns of privacy and noise levels, these constraints were designed around to take advantage the amount light that could be brought it off of the longest side of the home.

4/29

To fit in with the neighborhood, the facade is broken up into two colors - black and grey - to scale the volume.

5/29

The courtyard shares the natural light brought in from the upper level western clerestory windows.

6/29

The longest facade of the home sits across from a balcony lined apartment building.

7/29

To maximize the amount of light where time is most spent, we flipped the traditional domestic section and placed the living areas on the second level, and the bedrooms on the first floor.

8/29

With living spaces rather than bedrooms on the upper floor, the private spaces of the lower level are tucked away behind an interior courtyard.

9/29

The west side of the house facing the alleyway is supported by traditional balloon frame construction, which sits upon concrete foundation walls enclosing the basement, and supports four major roof trusses.

10/29

The kitchen, living, and dining spaces are located on the upper level, with a curved interior courtyard on level 1.

11/29

1200

12/29

The interior courtyard is formed by a swelling of the hallway connecting the bedrooms on the lower level.

13/29

The upstairs is defined by 4 trusses with skylights between them, distinguishing 5 unique spaces.

14/29

Light-filled, the interior courtyard holds a built-in reading nook and bookshelf.

15/29

Conceived of as more than a hallway, the interior courtyard offers a space of its own, overlooking the active alleyway and serving as a space for a cup of coffee or a play area for children.

16/29

Off of the interior courtyard are each of the three bedrooms, each lined with a wall of closet doors.

17/29

All of the second level living spaces are connected together under one large roof and defined by their location underneath structural trusses.

18/29
19/29

The second level looks out over the alleyway and acts as an interior balcony.

20/29

Each toilet area is defined as a recessed nook with ambient lighting.

21/29

The stair is tucked behind the curved wall of the interior courtyard.

22/29

The four structural trusses define five spaces: the living room, the powder room, the dining room, the island, and the kitchen.

23/29

The powder room sits beneath and between two trusses.

24/29

The second level is reached from a concealed staircase behind the courtyard’s curved wall.

25/29

A skylight brings in natural light from the glass ceiling that defines the bathroom volume.

26/29

The dining room lines the longest portion of level 2 and has an unobstructed view of the balconies across the alleyway.

27/29

At the opposite end lies the kitchen with large island lit by the skylights above.

28/29

The basement boasts a doughnut layout with two flexible spaces either end for office or lounge.

29/29

The seamless walk-in wet basement bath gives flexibility to future owners.

×
1/8

House, Some of This, Some of That is designed through the reinvention of borrowed architectural tropes: from the free plan to the raumplan.

3/8

A series of T-shaped volumes organize the private enclosed spaces of the home.

4/8

Each “T” joins adjacent spaces within the residence, such as closets with full bathrooms for the bedrooms, and a powder room with storage cabinets for the kitchen for the dining area.

5/8

The plan of the home is articulated by a series of “T”s that define both the soft and hard spaces between them.

6/8

The sectional organization of the home uses the raumplan to negotiate the slope of the site. Residents will ascend and descend within the home.

7/8

The cantilevered roof is structurally supported by the Storage Ts.

8/8

The Storage Ts - sprinkled throughout the house - serve as room partitions to create a variety of niche spaces to be used both individually and collectively.

×
1/14

Towers within a Tower is a new tower typology that utilizes verticality to the benefit of the community.

3/14

Towers within a Tower stacks the individual rooms of an apartment unit rather than aggregating the rooms horizontally. Each apartment unit becomes its own individual tower.

4/14

The vertical apartment units then aggregate around a central core.

5/14

Three housing types satisfy the needs of three types of users: a studio unit, a one-bedroom unit, and a family unit. Each tower unit is unique in its proportion, organization, and color.

6/14

As the rooms shrink in size with each ascending level of a tower unit, balconies are formed between the units to provide views and access to light and air.

7/14

Besides serving as a functional circulation core, the shared space between the individual tower units fosters a sense of community within a highly dense living environment.

8/14

The units are clad in a ceramic tile with a soft color palette, typical to the residential context of Hong Kong.

9/14

The interior of each tower unit functionally articulates each room.

10/14

Each level of a tower unit has a unique view of Hong Kong and connection to the shared community spaces of the apartment tower.

11/14

Tower units aggregate together to create neighborhood blocks surrounding a shared core. These blocks stack vertically, making this a highly adaptable system into various site conditions within Hong Kong.

12/14

This system of aggregation can be used as urban residential infill between existing apartment towers.

13/14

Or, the tower units can form a low-rise community.

14/14

Not least, the tower units can adapt to various topographical site conditions.

×
1/9

“Design our home to be clean and tidy” was the only instruction given by our client for the 1,100 square foot renovation of their Hong Kong apartment.

3/9

With storage at a premium in Hong Kong, much of the family’s apartment was devoted to a heterogenous collection of storage furniture: wardrobes, chests, bookcases, and boxes.

4/9

The Storage T consolidates all of the household’s items within a single storage system that is one with walls and doorways.

Storage becomes the architecture of the home.

5/9

The Storage T both unites and divides the apartment through a series of thresholds that mark the entrance to each of the three bedrooms in the apartment.

6/9

The Storage T cabinets both organize and conceal the contents of each room.

7/9

Keeping the space “clean and tidy,” the Storage T can hold extra pillows and pillowcases, stools for large family gatherings during Chinese New Year, as well as books and paperwork.

8/9

There is room for both the everyday clothing items as well as extra umbrellas to see off all of the family’s dinner guests on a rainy evening.

9/9

The Storage T organizes the layout and contents of the apartment, making a unique domestic spatial experience out of the simple act of storing.

×
1/9

Erasing building constraints of walls and floors, spaces within the home are governed by coordinates X, Y, and Z.

3/9

Appearing almost like a warehouse, House XYZ brings together all of the objects that make a house a place of domesticity.

4/9

At the center-most part of the house is the bed for sleeping.

5/9

Below is a space for bathing.

6/9

Towards the window is the kitchen for cooking.

7/9

Adjacent and lower is the space for eating.

8/9

Beyond is the living area.

9/9

Above it all is the place for the grand piano.

×
1/12

The 3-Families House is a co-housing community in the rapidly developing city of Shaoxing, China.

3/12

With a traditional gable roof that splits in two, the house forms a dialogue with the surrounding complex urban roofscape.

4/12

Surrounded by a dense field of small single family homes, the split gable roof holds housing for three individual families and a neighborhood daycare center.

5/12

The section dynamically changes to uniquely accommodate the three families - creating both communal areas and private spaces.

6/12

The house is comprised of three distinct layers of program: a daycare on the ground floor; a communal dining area with private kitchens on the second level; and, each of the family’s bedrooms on level three.

7/12

A large horizontal opening along the long side of the house gives expansive views of the surrounding neighborhood roofscape.

8/12

On the ground level, the 3-Families House provides an public outdoor space for the neighborhood underneath its large cantilever in addition to a community daycare center.

9/12

Level 2 holds shared communal spaces for the three families: a communal dining table, urban gardens, and relaxation nooks, in addition to private kitchens for each family.

10/12

Shifting bedrooms on the third floor separate the three living units from each other. A central light-filled atrium bring light and air to each of the bedrooms and views down to the community area below.

11/12

The structure accommodates a diversity of programs and inhabitants within a single form.

12/12

The split gable roof atrium sectionally connections the private bedroom suites of Level 3 with the communal areas of Level 2.

×
1/10

The Table Top Apartments uses a system of modules based on the form of stacking table tops to generate affordable housing on infill sites through NYC.

3/10

At its smallest unitary scale, each table top shape fits within the typical 25’ wide lot, bringing in light on all sides, while maintaining privacy.

4/10

Three unitary shapes - a circle, square, and rectangle - define each table top. These modular elements form the structure of the unit: columns and slabs.

5/10

The table top modules aggregate to form an ever changing geometry that by design brings light and air down to all levels of the Table Top Apartments.

6/10

The system of modules can generate 4-story walk-ups, towers with setbacks and cascading balconies, and even superblocks.

7/10

As the units aggregate next to one another, they naturally form atriums between floor levels, bringing in light and air between all units on all levels.

8/10

The use of three different unitary shapes, which are deliberately misaligned when stacked, create apertures in the slab between units. These vertical atriums serve as interior light wells and circulation space for the residents.

9/10

The circulation and access to each unit can be used informally by residents similar to a front stoop.

10/10

The Table Top Apartments creates a new mode of living between the inhabitants, their neighbors, and the public.

×
1/13

Give me a minute, please! offers a place of respite and relaxation along the Chicago Riverwalk.

3/13

Located at the confluence of the Chicago River’s three branches, a large red pyramid marks the start of the riverwalk.

4/13

Currently at the site, we approached the largest structure of artist Robert Burnier’s 2018 series Black Tiberinus as a found object, with the ambition to extend the use of the existing artwork.

5/13

Searching for a design that could reuse the artwork’s structure to create a new type of space along the Riverwalk, the pyramid offered material and structural efficiency as well as an iconic form with a generous roof.

6/13

Relative to the city, the large pyramidal form commands its presence by distinguishing itself from its context. Acting like a big umbrella, the pyramid houses various objects underneath its cover.

7/13

Zoom in section

8/13

The commanding red pyramid marks the western-most entrance to the Chicago Riverwalk.

9/13

The pyramidal form gives even greater height to the structure that was already visible from Upper Wacker Drive. The structure’s presence encourages curiosity.

10/13

Each of the spaces within the 9-square grid holds a unique atmosphere where visitors can pause to relax and find their own space to take a minute.

11/13

From a distance, the pyramid expresses its singularity. However, upon visitors approach, the objects within begin to provide an intimate and human scale.

12/13

The eight surrounding spatial artifacts lend unique atmospheres underneath the monolithic structure - allowing for individuals to find a momentary space all their own.

13/13

The height of the pyramid's canopy emphasizes a horizontal view of the surrounding riverscape - encouraging reflection and pause to take in curated views of the river.

×
1/9

Block Sauna 143 is a neighborhood sauna that invites patrons in from the sidewalk, into its half-underground, half-above-ground sauna sequence.

3/9

Off of the neighborhood sidewalk, a ramp slopes downward to bring sauna-goers deeper into the submerged building, creating more and more privacy.

4/9

The sauna deck houses the summer lounge, storage space, chimneys, and skylight boxes for the spaces below. The objects curate intimate yet open spaces for the sun bather.

5/9

As visitors walk down the entrance ramp, the building appears extremely transparent with its continuous perimeter clerestory windows, yet the surrounding walls become deeper and deeper, lending privacy to the activities within.

6/9

At the lowest point of the sauna, the height and thickness of the concrete walls provide total privacy, yet allow the interior to receive ample daylight.

7/9

Surrounding the inner courtyard are a set of ramps that connect the various sauna programs.

8/9

At the deepest level of the building are the showers and sauna - the most intimate spaces. Here, the clerestory window continues to bring light and view of the surrounding landscape, while the depth of the walls lend privacy to the space.

9/9

Finally, upon reaching the sauna, the thickness of the walls and depth of the slab creates a both a private and enclosed experience, yet brings in ample daylighting and connection to nature.

×
1/13

Beach Party! is a reinterpretation of MoMA PS1’s courtyard as a public beach, bringing the ocean’s edge to the center of the city, for all to enjoy.

3/13

Beach Party! brings the four most familiar elements of the beach to the museum's courtyard: sand, water, swings, and a bouncy ball. Sand is borrowed from five of New York’s beaches facing erosion from high tides.

4/13

Over the course of the summer, the strips will mix and merge as visitors frolic in the sand, their communal play erasing divisions and creating an ever-changing sandscape.

5/13

The beach at the center of the city offers a space of respite and reflection: a constructed beachscape of natural materials makes us consider the importance of maintaining our beaches at the periphery.

6/13

At the opening of Beach Party, sand from Far Rockaway, Long Beach, Fire Island, Jamaica Bay, and Westhampton will form a striped groundscape, each distinguished by colors and textures unique to their original beaches.

7/13

Three beams float above the Beach, their shadows suggesting three ‘zones’ below while leaving the Beach a single, unfettered space. An oversized Beach Ball sits in one zone, the Looped Pool in another, and an area for large scale performances.

8/13

The two longer beams carry between them Hammocks - a nod towards ubiquitous beachfront construction fencing.

9/13

Suspended above these sands, two 160 foot long beams span the length of the full length of the courtyard to the museum’s podium, allowing museum-goers a temporary space for relaxation before and after their visit.

10/13

An oversized Beach Ball bounces between the overhead beams and creates an interactive object for visitors.

11/13

The beams are raised to a height of 7'6", leaving the Beach below a single, unfettered space.

12/13

The only element that sits on the ground is the Looped Pool cast from sand aggregates from New York's beaches, offering a 6” wading pool to cool off and experiences the delight of water under the sun.

13/13

As New York braces against rising tides, Beach Party is a timely, if ephemeral, reminder that we should never take one of its most precious public spaces for granted.

×
1/8

Situated on Canal Street Triangle in Manhattan’s Chinatown, the Chinatown Gateway greets visitors with a unique circular form - the universal symbol of inclusion and harmony.

3/8

A staple of Chinese architecture, the Moon Gate serves as both a gateway and a window. The Chinatown Gateway scales the traditional passage for a single visitor up to a gateway for an entire neighborhood.

4/8

Standing 45’ tall, the circular archway transforms the traditional paifangs (or gateways) that greet visitors to Chinatowns around the world into a unique form - the universal symbol of inclusion and harmony.

5/8

The familiar form of the Chinese Moon Gate captures within its circular frame a lush urban landscape and the commotion of community.

6/8

At the intersection of many converging paths, the Chinatown Gateway sitting on the urban triangular site connects the neighborhoods together.

7/8

Nestled within the Gateway is public seating for forty visitors, a performance space, and an urban garden with five gingko trees.

8/8

Balancing respect for Chinese design heritage and serving an expanded role as a marker for Lower Manhattan, the new Chinatown Gateway captures the ever-changing streetscapes within its portal.

×
1/5

The Primitive Pavilion is a deep roofscape composed of primary geometries set upon elemental columns, bridging man between Earth and Sky at West Kowloon Cultural Park in Hong Kong.

3/5

A deep roofscape, composed of six primary geometries intersecting one another - one triangle, two squares, and three circles - are supported by five columns that curate a free-flowing space for a wide range of activities.

4/5

The roofscape casts a kaleidoscope of color and light upon on a soft landscape surfaced with recycled rubber.

5/5

Nursery Park is only the first step in the Primitive Pavilion's long life: a kit-of-parts construction allows its six primary geometries to be reassembled efficiently in other locations across Hong Kong.

×
1/7

In the Loop is an ADA accessible ramp that gently brings visitors up to San Antonio City Hall’s entrance.

3/7

Three ADA accessible ramps ascend six-and-a-half feet over three runs to reach San Antonio’s City Hall Entrance from Plaza de Armas, with a staircase completing the rhombus's loop.

4/7

The ramp and stair converge at City Hall’s common landing, creating an entrance for all, and enclosing a grand circular opening at its center.

5/7

The circular opening hosts community activities under the shade of a grand oak tree.

6/7

The contemporary lightness of the ramp contrasts against the heavy masonry of the historical City Hall.

7/7

The addition of an accessible approach to City Hall’s east entrance offers an opportunity to enliven the Plaza de Armas in its traditional role as the heart of San Antonio.

×
1/5

The Grand Lattice viewing decks offer an opportunity for a new type of public space at the intersection of city and lake, park and highway.

3/5

A stair at each median of Lake Shore Drive brings pedestrians up above the underpass to look out over the lake and the city.

4/5

A series of viewing decks along Lake Shore Drive serve as pedestrian gateways that bridge together Lake Michigan and the City of Chicago.

5/5

The viewing deck structures take on the fundamental, bare bones of steel-frame construction without the need of a facade. As seen from Lake Shore Drive, the lattice structures serve as successive landmarks for the underpasses below.

×
×
1/10

Looking to New York City’s iconic vertical spaces to overcome limited horizontal space, Dizzy’s SoHo seeks to create an interior vertical experience all its own.

3/10

Each successive level of Dizzy’s provides a sensory experience that elevates its dining experience beyond simply tasting food.

4/10

Four levels complete the sensory experience: the Omakase Kitchen on Level 1; the Music Box Bar and Lounge on Level 2; the Gallery on Level 3; and finally, the Loggia on Level 4.

5/10

A translucent metal façade in the shape of a face both conceals and exposes the four stories of distinct yet connected spatial experiences.

6/10

Model.

7/10

On the ground level is the Omakase Kitchen, where Dizzy’s SoHo invites its patrons into its back of house.

8/10

Ascending to the second level, the Music Box links the upper levels together acoustically.

9/10

Above, the Gallery overlooks the Music Box below and provides an open yet secluded casual space to view art and listen to live performances.

10/10

The Loggia on Level 4 is a formal dining space for 16 patrons resting on a cluster of balconies resembling lilypads afloat on water.

×
1/10

A ten-foot long model of the Table Top Apartments was displayed for the 2018 Architectural League Prize of New York's Objective Installation.

3/10

The Table Top Apartment's model readily relates the figure of the “table top” as the structural and tectonic system for modular housing.

4/10

The variety of table top geometries - a circle, square, and rectangle - allow for a lively and dynamic façade.

5/10

Between the Table Top units are vertical courtyards that bring light and air deep within the housing complex.

6/10

The typical enclosed double-loaded corridor instead is replaced by an open-air, dynamic circulation system that encourage neighbors to socialize and fosters community.

7/10

Ascending and descending within the building, residents activate the interstitial spaces between units.

8/10

The openings between the slabs allows the circulation to bridge horizontally and vertically with the field of units.

9/10

At the highest level of the building, residents have an uninterrupted view between the units and can view down into the vertical atriums below.

10/10

The Table Top units allow for both individualization and peaceful retreat while at the same time engage with the larger residential community within.

×
1/27

Smuggling Architecture is a Graham Foundation funded installation at the Swiss Architecture Museum in Basel, Switzerland.

3/27

The installation optimistically smuggles meaning and value into the interiors of three generic suburban house plans through borrowed architectural orders.

4/27

Set in front of a research wall on the topic, the three models appear as ordinary American suburban homes - spaced as they would be along a residential street.

5/27

Included in the group exhibition titled Under the Radar at the Swiss Architecture Museum, the Smuggling Architecture installation seeks to reclaim the suburban housing stock that has been neglected by modern architecture.

6/27

Builder home plans are formed by the aggregation of specific rooms: bedrooms and bathrooms; living room, kitchen, breakfast nook, and dining room; laundry room and garage - at a minimum.

7/27

For pick-and-choose buyers, if you want a larger house, you simply add another room. With a variety of sizes and styles, builder home plans easily accommodate everyone’s needs.

8/27

Three builders home were selected as sites for smuggling architecture.

9/27

Believe it or not, this is the #1 selling builder's home plan under 2,000 square feet. Functionally, this home accommodates the needs of the nuclear family, organizing master and children's bedrooms on opposite ends of the home.

10/27

We smuggle an enfilade through the length of the home - that brings room-to-room-to-room together along a singular path from the garage to the children's rooms.

11/27

In many of the rooms, the introduction of the enfilade nearly goes unperceived.

12/27

The rooms function independently as they did prior to the enfilade smuggle.

13/27

However, from certain vistas, the enfilade that cuts at a curve through the home presents itself.

14/27

This 2,500 square foot home plan centralizes all of the home's shared spaces (living, dining, and kitchen) at the center of the home, and lines the perimeter with the bedrooms.

15/27

We smuggle the concept of Eero Saarinen's Miller House plan to the interior of this builder home: section each of the bedroom clusters into suites at the four corners of the home and leaving the space between as shared space for the family.

16/27

The areas between the bedroom suites are reorganized and used for the kitchen, dining room, family room, and library.

17/27

Off of the shared areas are the entrances to the guest suite, the children's suite, the master suite, and the utilities suite.

18/27

Likewise, from each suite, direct views to the shared areas of the home bring the various suites together.

19/27

Here, in the children's suite, two bedrooms connect to a private hallway and shared bathroom.

20/27

This 3,000 square foot builder's home plan is defined by a series of stylized chamfered corners throughout the large home.

21/27

We smuggle anterooms into the layout of this home to order the sequence and transition between the many rooms of the home.

22/27

From the main entrance, the anterooms that are shaped as rotated squares throughout the home, offer a vista of successive rooms.

23/27

Within some rooms of the home, the introduction of the anterooms is hardly noticable.

24/27

While in others, the anteroom serves to connect through distance and passage up to four distinct areas of the home.

25/27

The anterooms playfully animate the interior of the home, creating multiple niches and spaces of connection.

26/27

Rather than connect directly two distinct rooms (such as here a bedroom and the study), the anterooms offers a space between that allows for both separation and connection.

27/27

The smuggled anterooms offer a new way of inhabiting the builder home that brings awareness to the separation and distinction of each of the rooms.

×
1/8

Crowns is an installation at Volume Gallery that reinterprets crown molding as a series of four spatial sculptures.

3/8

Considered a domestic aesthetic, crown molding is a contractor’s means to conceal the seam between two planes: between floor-to-wall, wall-to-ceiling, threshold-to-threshold.

4/8

Two crown molding profiles weave together for form a single three-dimensional object.

5/8

As visitors move around the gallery, new profiles are discovered.

6/8

Crown molding - typically considered static and standard - appears dynamic and unconventional.

7/8

From different viewing angles, each Crown appears to outline a unique crown molding profile.

8/8

Crown molding no longer acts as the cosmetic for a joint, but rather exists independently, tracing seams to become the object itself.

×